...the who's who,
and the what's what 
of the space industry

Space Careers

news Space News

Search News Archive

Title

Article text

Keyword

  • Home
  • News
  • 3-D Radargram brings new focus to Mars' north polar cap

3-D Radargram brings new focus to Mars' north polar cap

Written by  Tuesday, 29 November 2022 06:03
Write a comment
Tucson AZ (SPX) Nov 29, 2022
A new enhanced 3-D radar image offer a greatly improved view of the interior of the Martian north polar cap, according to a paper led by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Nathaniel Putzig. Putzig's team, which included PSI researchers Matthew Perry, Isaac Smith, Aaron Russell and intern Isabella Mueller, produced and analyzed the 3-D image using observations obtained with the Sh

A new enhanced 3-D radar image offer a greatly improved view of the interior of the Martian north polar cap, according to a paper led by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Nathaniel Putzig.

Putzig's team, which included PSI researchers Matthew Perry, Isaac Smith, Aaron Russell and intern Isabella Mueller, produced and analyzed the 3-D image using observations obtained with the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO).

"In creating 3-D radargrams, we assemble all the data from many 2-D profiles across the region of interest and apply advanced 3-D imaging methods to unravel all of the interferences present in the 2-D profiles, placing the reflected signals at their points of origin to produce a geometrically corrected 3-D image of the subsurface," said Putzig, lead author of "New Views of the Internal Structure of Planum Boreum from Enhanced 3D Imaging of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar Data" that appears in the Planetary Science Journal.

"The new 3-D radargram really brings into focus many features that were previously difficult or impossible to map due to incomplete imaging of inherently 3-D features with a collection of 2-D profiles," Putzig said. "So far, we have only scratched the surface of understanding what the new data volume is telling us about the history of Martian polar processes and climate, and there is a lot more detailed mapping work to be done."

SHARAD probes the subsurface - up to 4 kilometers deep - emitting radar waves within a 15- to 25-megahertz frequency band to achieve a desired depth resolution of approximately 15 meters. The returned radar waves, which are captured by the SHARAD antenna, are sensitive to changes in the electrical characteristics of rock, sand, and water ice that may be present in the surface and subsurface. Changes in the reflection characteristics of the subsurface, caused by layers deposited by geological processes in the ancient history of Mars, are also visible.

"The results of the 3-D imaging offer a better understanding of Mars by providing a greatly clarified view of subsurface features, which can be used to inform geologic interpretations of the origins of the polar deposits and their implications for Martian climate history. The details of the subsurface layering geometry can be used to infer the processes involved in the deposition and erosion of the layers over time," Putzig said.

Research Report:"New Views of the Internal Structure of Planum Boreum from Enhanced 3D Imaging of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar Data"


Related Links
Planetary Science Institute
Mars News and Information at MarsDaily.com
Lunar Dreams and more

Tweet

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once

credit card or paypal

SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly

paypal only



MARSDAILY
Mars was covered by 300 meter deep oceans
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX) Nov 18, 2022
Mars is called the red planet. But once, it was actually blue and covered in water, bringing us closer to finding out if Mars had ever harboured life. Most researchers agree that there has been water on Mars, but just how much water is still debated. Now a study from the University of Copenhagen shows that some 4.5 billion years ago, there was enough water for the entire planet to be covered in a 300-metre-deep ocean. "At this time, Mars was bombarded with asteroids filled with ice. It ... read more


Read more from original source...

You must login to post a comment.
Loading comment... The comment will be refreshed after 00:00.

Be the first to comment.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR

* Denotes Required Field
Personal information
Message

Interested in Space?

Hit the buttons below to follow us...