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Summit of technical excellence

Tuesday, 22 September 2020 06:30
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Summit of technical excellence Image: Summit of technical excellence
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Long Beach CA (SPX) Sep 23, 2020
Leading space systems company, Rocket Lab, has announced its next Electron launch will be a rideshare mission to low Earth orbit for Planet and Spaceflight Inc.'s customer Canon Electronics. The mission - named 'In Focus' in a nod to the Earth-imaging satellites onboard - will lift-off in October from Rocket Lab's private orbital launch site, Launch Complex 1, in New Zealand. The mis

ISS moves to avoid space debris

Tuesday, 22 September 2020 05:04
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Washington (AFP) Sept 23, 2020
Astronauts on the International Space Station carried out an "avoidance maneuver" Tuesday to ensure they would not be hit by a piece of debris, said US space agency NASA, urging better management of objects in Earth's orbit. Russian and US flight controllers worked together during a two-and-a-half-minute operation to adjust the station's orbit and move further away, avoiding collision.

Perseverance will use x-rays to hunt fossils

Tuesday, 22 September 2020 05:04
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Pasadena CA (JPL) Sep 23, 2020
NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has a challenging road ahead: After having to make it through the harrowing entry, descent, and landing phase of the mission on Feb. 18, 2021, it will begin searching for traces of microscopic life from billions of years back. That's why it's packing PIXL, a precision X-ray device powered by artificial intelligence (AI). Short for Planetary Instrument fo
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Pasadena CA (JPL) Sep 23, 2020
A small near-Earth asteroid (or NEA) will briefly visit Earth's neighborhood on Thursday, Sept. 24, zooming past at a distance of about 13,000 miles (22,000 kilometers) above our planet's surface. The asteroid will make its close approach below the ring of geostationary satellites orbiting about 22,000 miles (36,000 kilometers) away from Earth. Based on its brightness, scientists estimate
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Lancaster UK (SPX) Sep 22, 2020
Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit in a continuation of earlier Lancaster research. Helium-3 is a rare isotope of helium, in which one neutron is missing. It becomes superfluid at extremely low temperatures, enabling unusual properties such as a lack of friction for moving objects. It was thought t
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Worcester MA (SPX) Sep 23, 2020
Using a limited set of mathematical equations, Worcester Polytechnic Institute mathematical sciences professor Mayer Humi said he has confirmed a 224-year-old math conjecture about the origins of our solar system, providing insights about the process that leads to the formation of solar systems across the universe. "The science community is aware by now that there are thousands of solar sy
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WASHINGTON — Commercial spaceflight company Blue Origin is considering development of commercial space stations, with NASA as a potential early customer.

Blue Origin posted a job opening Sept. 18 for am “Orbital Habitat Formulation Lead” at its headquarters in the Seattle suburb of Kent, Washington.

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WASHINGTON — The Space Force announced in June that one of its major field organizations will be an acquisition command that will unify the current mishmash of agencies that handle space programs.

The new organization, the Space Systems Command, has not yet been stood up.

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NASA's new Mars rover will use X-rays to hunt fossils
In this illustration, NASA's Perseverance Mars rover uses the Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry (PIXL). Located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, the X-ray spectrometer will help search for signs of ancient microbial life in rocks. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has a challenging road ahead: After having to make it through the harrowing entry, descent, and landing phase of the mission on Feb. 18, 2021, it will begin searching for traces of microscopic life from billions of years back. That's why it's packing PIXL, a precision X-ray device powered by artificial intelligence (AI).

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Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?
An X-class solar flare (X9.3) emitted on September 6, 2017, and captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in extreme ultraviolet light. Image courtesy of NASA/GSFC/SDO

Solar flares are violent explosions on the sun that fling out high-energy charged particles, sometimes toward Earth, where they disrupt communications and endanger satellites and astronauts.

But as scientists discovered in 1996, flares can also create seismic activity—sunquakes—releasing impulsive acoustic waves that penetrate deep into the sun's interior.

While the relationship between solar flares and sunquakes is still a mystery, new findings suggest that these "acoustic transients"—and the surface ripples they generate—can tell us a lot about flares and may someday help us forecast their size and severity.

A team of physicists from the United States, Colombia and Australia has found that part of the acoustic energy released from a flare in 2011 emanated from about 1,000 kilometers beneath the solar surface—the photosphere—and, thus, far beneath the that triggered the quake.

Over the Moon

Monday, 21 September 2020 18:37
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Over the Moon Image: Over the Moon
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The space industry has a rich history of building supply-chain relationships to deliver complex and exacting space systems.

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WASHINGTON — NASA and the U.S. Space Force have formally agreed to work together in areas like space policy, research, technology and the protection of the planet from hazardous objects such as asteroids.

Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Chief of Space Operations Gen.

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SAN FRANCISCO – Microsoft unveiled Azure Orbital Sept. 22, a service to help customers move data from satellites directly into the Azure cloud for processing and storage.

“With Azure Orbital, we’re taking our infrastructure to space, enabling anyone to access satellite data and capabilities from Azure,” CEO Satya Nadella said during the Microsoft Ignite 2020 conference.

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