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AGIS signs Kleos' data evaluation contract

Written by  Saturday, 22 January 2022 07:53
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Luxembourg (SPX) Jan 22, 2022
Kleos Space, a space- powered radio frequency reconnaissance data-as-a-service (DaaS) company, has received a data evaluation contract from Advanced Ground Information Systems, Inc. (AGIS). AGIS simultaneously processes up to 200,000 real-time sensor reports to provide command and control communication capabilities to US military, government and first responders. Its Command, Control, Comm

Kleos Space, a space- powered radio frequency reconnaissance data-as-a-service (DaaS) company, has received a data evaluation contract from Advanced Ground Information Systems, Inc. (AGIS).

AGIS simultaneously processes up to 200,000 real-time sensor reports to provide command and control communication capabilities to US military, government and first responders. Its Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Cyber, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C5ISR) system enables data interoperability between U.S. and NATO C5ISR systems to provide a common operational picture.

AGIS' C5ISR system will be using Kleos' electronic intelligence (ELINT) data to complement other intelligence data sourcesto provide hostile and illegal shipping awareness to its customers with the ability to direct forces.

Under the contract, AGIS will have accessto Kleos' Guardian Locate data product for evaluation purposes. The product delivers processed radio frequency transmissions collected over key areas of interest irrespective of the presence of positioning systems.

Kleos' Chief Revenue Officer, Eric von Eckartsberg, said, "AGIS has a long history of providing critical data to those in the field. We're excited for our geolocation sensor data to be integrated into their command- and-control systems, which will help bringing Kleos' products to a wide array of government customers around the world. Kleos' data complements existing datasets and can be used to validate or tip and cue other sources to improve the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities."

AGIS' CEO, Cap Beyer, said "We are looking forward to working with Kleos, and providing users the ability to integrate Kleos' intelligence information with a mature multinational C5ISR system and other intelligence sources."

Kleos' radio frequency geolocation data enhances the detection of illegal activity, including piracy, drug and people smuggling, border security challenges and illegal fishing. Its global activity-based data is sold as-a-service to governments and commercial entities, complementing existing commercial datasets.

Kleos currently has eight satellites in orbit with launches for its Patrol and Observer Missions scheduled for April and June 2022 respectively.


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