...the who's who,
and the what's what 
of the space industry

news Space News

Search News Archive

Title

Article text

Keyword

China launches new Earth-observation remote-sensing satellite

Written by  Sunday, 26 July 2020 00:26
Write a comment
Beijing (XNA) Jul 27, 2020
China launched an Earth-observation remote-sensing satellite at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in North China's Shanxi province on Saturday, according to authorities in charge of the program. A joint statement from the China National Space Administration and the Ministry of Natural Resources said the Ziyuan 3-03 lifted off at 11:13 am atop a Long March 4B carrier rocket to a sun-synch

China launched an Earth-observation remote-sensing satellite at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in North China's Shanxi province on Saturday, according to authorities in charge of the program.

A joint statement from the China National Space Administration and the Ministry of Natural Resources said the Ziyuan 3-03 lifted off at 11:13 am atop a Long March 4B carrier rocket to a sun-synchronous orbit about 500 kilometers above the ground. The launch marked the 341st mission of the Long March rocket fleet.

Developed by the China Academy of Space Technology in Beijing, the spacecraft is tasked with joining its two predecessors in the Ziyuan 3 series to carry out space-based mapping, geological information collection and emergency response support. It also will be used to make resource surveys and environmental inspections, the statement said, adding that it will be delivered to users after in-orbit tests.

The satellite has advanced equipment, such as a three-line array panchromatic stereo camera and a laser altimeter, capable of generating high-resolution pictures. Its service will be extensively helpful in a number of public fields, including natural resources management, transportation, emergency response and environmental protection.

The satellite is designed to work at least eight years in orbit, the statement noted.

Also lifted by the rocket was a low-orbit data collection satellite, Tianqi 10, to be operated by Guodian Gaoke, a Beijing-based satellite operator.

The small satellite is the seventh in the company's Tianqi network, which is being built to offer space-based Internet of Things services, according to the Beijing operator.

Source: Xinhua News Agency


Related Links
China National Space Administration
Earth Observation News - Suppiliers, Technology and Application

Tweet

Thanks for being there;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5+ Billed Monthly

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once

credit card or paypal



EARTH OBSERVATION
China's marine satellites support coral reef protection in South China Sea
Beijing (XNA) Jul 16, 2020
China's domestically-developed marine observation satellites will be used to study the distribution of coral reefs in the South China Sea, and facilitate protection and restoration of coral reefs. State broadcaster CCTV reported that the National Satellite Ocean Application Service will cooperate with a coral reef research center in Guangxi University to monitor coral reefs in the South China Sea with the help of marine satellite and high-resolution satellite data. They will combine sea surf ... read more


Read more from original source...

You must login to post a comment.
Loading comment... The comment will be refreshed after 00:00.

Be the first to comment.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR

* Denotes Required Field
Personal information
Message

Interested in Space?

Hit the buttons below to follow us...